Register and pay for your programs online, or download a registration form
to mail to the Museum with your payment.

May
Birds of Spring, Saturday, May 21

June
Connecticut State BioBlitz 2016, Saturday, June 4
Exploring Connecticut’s Towns–Essex! Saturday, June 11
Elizabeth Park Conservancy’s Rose Sunday, Sunday, June 19
Explore New Haven’s Historic Grove Street Cemetery, Saturday, June 25
K.A.S.E.T. Archaeology Field School for Kids, Monday, June 27 through Friday, July 1

July
K.A.S.E.T. Marine Explorers, Session 1: Tuesday, July 5 through Thursday, July 7
K.A.S.E.T. Magnificent Microbes! Monday, July 11 through Friday, July 15
K.A.S.E.T. Space Astronomy, Monday, July 11 through Friday, July 15
K.A.S.E.T. Marine Explorers, Session 2: Monday, July 18 through Wednesday, July 20
Archaeology Field School for Educators, Monday, July 18 through Friday, July 22
Special UConn Bug Week Event, Saturday, July 30

August
CSMNH Adult Archaeology Field School, Monday, August 1 through Friday, August 5
Behind the Scenes Tour: Stony Creek Quarry, Saturday, August 13
Hammonasset Shoreline Ecosystems, Thursday, August 18
Museum Lecture: Food and Diet at Old New-Gate Prison, Saturday, August 20

Fall Preview
Jamestown Settlement, Arlington National Cemetery, and Old Town Alexandra, VA,
Friday, September 23 through Sunday, September 25

Birds of Spring
Paula Coughlin, Science Educator
Saturday, May 21, 9 am to 11 am – Pomfret, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 5 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Spring is an exciting time to explore the various bird habitats at the Connecticut Audubon Society’s Bafflin Sanctuary. Join naturalist and science educator Paula Coughlin for a morning walk through the grasslands, forests, and wetlands of Bafflin Sanctuary. Observe breeding birds singing, nesting, and raising their chicks. Bring binoculars, a water bottle, and dress for protection from ticks.

Connecticut State BioBlitz 2016
Saturday, June 4, 10 am to 3 pm
CREC Two Rivers Magnet Middle School, East Hartford, CT

The internationally recognized Connecticut State BioBlitz is part contest, part festival, part educational event, and part scientific endeavor. Scientists from UConn and other universities, agencies and nature-oriented organizations from across the Northeast will gather to see how many species of animals and plants can be collected or photographed and identified in 24 hours. People of all ages are invited to come and see Connecticut’s rich plant and animal life, attend presentations about biodiversity, talk with scientists and naturalists, and participate in the ongoing activities.

The University of Connecticut’s Center for Conservation and Biodiversity will be teaming up with the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, Connecticut Geographic Alliance, and Two Rivers Magnet Middle School to host the 2016 BioBlitz—made possible by a grant from the Richard P. Garmany Fund at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving. For more information, visit http://web.uconn.edu/mnh/bioblitz/.

Special Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns–Essex!
Essex Historical Society
Saturday, June 11, 10 am to 11:30 am – Essex, CT
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Members & Donors)

The historic village of Essex was first surveyed in the mid-17th century as a section of “Potapaug Quarter,” a division of Saybrook Colony. This settlement on the Connecticut River possesses a rich history that includes shipbuilding, a British raid during the War of 1812, and a thriving visitor destination that continues into the present day. Explore over three centuries of Essex as you stroll down its 18th and 19th century streets to learn about the major industries, structures, and personalities that shaped this charming New England village. In the afternoon, visit Essex Historical Society’s Pratt House, home to the descendants of Lt. William Pratt, one of the town’s earliest settlers.


Elizabeth Park Conservancy’s Rose Sunday
Sunday, June 19, 10 am to 4 pm – Elizabeth Park, Hartford, CT

Stop by and visit the Museum and Archaeology Center at the Elizabeth Park Conservancy’s Rose Sunday and learn about natural and cultural history through our ethnobotany exhibit! This event celebrates the park’s 15,000 blooming roses in America’s oldest municipal rose garden. Explore the world famous rose garden, a two and a half acre park that has about 800 varieties of roses. There will be a number of cultural, arts, and heritage organizations participating as well as performing arts and children’s activities! For more information and directions visit http://elizabethparkct.org.


Explore New Haven’s Historic Grove Street Cemetery
Patricia Illingworth, Friends of Grove Street Cemetery
Saturday, June 25, 12:30 pm – New Haven, CT
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum members)

The Grove Street Cemetery, the first chartered burial ground in the United States, succeeded the previous common burial site at the New Haven Green. Its creation was prompted by the yellow fever epidemics in 1794 and 1795, which led to as many as 5,000 burials on the already crowded city green.

Sometimes referred to as the Westminster of Yale, this historic cemetery maintains the graves of early New Haven residents, fourteen Yale presidents, and hundreds of faculty members, alumni, and campus luminaries. Some of the many historic figures buried at the cemetery include Noah Webster, Eli Whitney, paleontologist O.C. Marsh, the “Father of American Football” Walter Camp, the inventor of vulcanized rubber Charles Goodyear, missionary Hiram Bingham, and Roger Sherman, signer of the Articles of Association, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution.

Professional Learning: Archaeology Field School for Educators
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, CSMNH UConn
Monday, July 18 through Friday, July 22, 9 am to 3 pm – Windsor, CT
Advance registration required: Free for educators.

Educators can spend a week learning about archaeology at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center’s Field School for Teachers. This field school is designed to give educators who provide archaeological opportunities for students a deeper understanding of the ethical aspects of archaeology, as well as proper archaeological field techniques, data management, and reporting.

Participants will experience an authentic archaeological investigation, working with primary sources at a historic site. They will also learn about the role of the Connecticut Office of State Archaeology and how it can be an important resource in developing archeological lessons and activities for students. Space is limited. To request a registration form please contact David Colberg at david.colberg@uconn.edu or 860.486.5690.


Special UConn Bug Week Event
Department of Extension, UConn
Saturday, July 30, 1 pm to 3 pm – Tolland County Extension Center, Vernon, CT

Discover the wonderful world of bugs at this UConn Bug Week event. There will be indoor presentations, live insect specimens, and expert led walks identifying insects in their natural habitats. Visit the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History’s table to see a variety of insect specimens from its natural history collection. For additional Bug Week information visit http://bugs.uconn.edu.



CSMNH Adult Archaeology Field School
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, CSMNH UConn
Monday, August 1 through Friday, August 5, 9 am to 3 pm – Glastonbury, CT
Advance registration required: $200 ($100 for Members & Donors)
Adults and teens ages 16+

Spend a week learning about archaeology at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center’s Field School! This field school will cover the ethical aspects of archaeology, as well as proper archaeological field techniques and data management. As a member of this program, you will have the opportunity to participate in an official Connecticut Office of State Archaeology dig. Your findings will add important information to our understanding of Connecticut’s rich historic past!



Behind the Scenes Tour: Stony Creek Quarry
Darrell Petit, Stony Creek Quarry
Saturday, August 13, 10:00 am – Branford, CT
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Members & Donors)

Stony Creek granite crystallized around 360 million years ago, and the granite was first quarried in 1858. This distinctive granite makes up a great deal of New York City’s architectural history, from the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty and the walkways of 42nd and 34th Streets, to the prestigious college campus of Columbia University. It has also been integrated into the foundations of many city landmarks such as the Brooklyn Bridge and Grand Central Station. Today the valued granite is used throughout the world. Join Stony Creek Quarry’s Darrell Petit for a close up look at the famous quarry and discover how the large granite deposit formed millions of years ago, and how various quarrying methods evolved over time.

Hammonasset Shoreline Ecosystems
Meigs Point Nature Center Staff, Hammonasset State Park
Thursday, August 18, 10 am to 11:30 am, rain or shine - Madison, CT
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members) All ages are welcome. Parking fees are not included.

Explore the ecosystems of Connecticut’s coast at Hammonasset State Park. Adjacent to Long Island Sound, in the shoreline town of Madison, the ecosystems of Hammonasset are swimming with life. From its sandy beach and rocky shore, to its salt marshes, Connecticut’s largest shoreline park is not only popular with beach-goers, but also a diverse collection of plants and animals that call this shoreline environment home. Join the Meigs Point Nature Center Staff and discover the characteristics of three ecosystems found at Hammonasset State Park.


Museum Lecture: Food and Diet at Old New-Gate Prison and Copper Mine 1790-1819
Dr. Sarah Sportman, Archaeological and Historical Services, Inc.
Saturday, August 20, 1 pm – Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs

Beginning in 1773, the Old New-Gate copper mine was used as a prison. During the Revolutionary War, the prison housed criminals, Tories, and POWs. In 1790 it became one of the first state prisons in the United States and it operated in that capacity until 1827.

In 2013 a multi-phase archeological survey was conducted at this National Historic Landmark. The excavations revealed prison-era artifacts dated from 1790-1819, including over 1300 well-preserved animal bones. Analysis of the bones revealed vestiges of meals prepared and consumed by inmates and guards. Contextualized through the accounts of prison overseers, inmates, visitors, local newspapers, and historians, the bones shed light on the dietary conditions, food procurement system, and daily life at one of the nation’s oldest and most notorious prisons.



Fall Preview: Jamestown Settlement, Arlington National Cemetery,
and Old Town Alexandra, VA

Friday, September 23 through Sunday, September 25
Advance registration required: $500 (single), $375 (double), $340 (triple), $320 (quad).
Adults and children ages 12 and above. Participants under 18 must be accompanied by an adult.

The fee includes round trip bus transportation, two nights accommodations in Old Town, Alexandria with buffet breakfast, and entrance to Historic Jamestown and Arlington National Cemetery.

This trip is sponsored by the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology (FOSA) with
the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center at UConn. Advance registration with full payment to FOSA is required prior to trip. To request a registration form contact David Colberg at david.colberg@uconn.edu or 860.486.5690.



K.A.S.E.T. Programs – UConn’s Kids Are Scientists & Engineers Too!
Advance registration through K.A.S.E.T required: $200 ($185 if registered before June 9)
Grades 5 through 10. 860.486.0194 - http://www.kaset.uconn.edu.

Archaeology Field School for Kids
Monday, June 27 through Friday, July 1, 9 am to 12 noon – UConn, Storrs

Do you like uncovering evidence to solve mysteries? Do you like the idea of getting your hands dirty while exploring the past? Spend a week with UConn archaeologists exploring the world of field archaeology. You will learn about the science, tools, and methods used by archaeologists and be part of a real archaeological field crew! Participants will be doing hands-on fieldwork and laboratory research at a professional, ongoing archaeological dig. We have been opening new areas of our on-campus dig site each year and every session we uncover something new!

Marine Explorers
Session 1: Tuesday, July 5 through Thursday, July 7, 9 am to 12 noon*
Session 2: Monday, July 18 through Wednesday, July 20, 9 am to 12 noon*
UConn, Storrs and Avery Point

Investigate how marine plants and animals adapt to their ocean environment during two mornings of hands-on activities in Storrs. On the third day, take a full-day trip to Project Oceanology at Avery Point for a lab with live animals and explore Long Island Sound aboard a research vessel. *This is a 3-day module: 2 mornings and one full-day field trip.

Magnificent Microbes!
Monday, July 11 through Friday, July 15, 9 am to 12 noon – UConn, Storrs

Explore unseen worlds that are all around you. Discover microscopic organisms that make your food taste good, and those that make your food go bad. Trek outside and hunt for microbes in lawns, ponds and woods! Watch gas production by the microbes living inside live termites. We’ll isolate DNA from bacteria and look at them with powerful microscopes. Join us and open your eyes to an exciting new world! Presented by the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Connecticut State Museum of Natural History.

Space Astronomy
Monday, July 11 through Friday, July 15, 9 am to 12 noon* – UConn, Storrs

Celebrate over 400 years of telescopic astronomy by building your own small telescope and learning what’s to be seen in the night sky. We’ll also track planets, a comet and one of the largest asteroids, make and test sundials and a moon dial, explore Mars using the latest NASA software, and make an iMovie of you flying around a planet of your choice. In addition to activities in UConn’s Planetarium and astronomy labs, you’ll get to use a telescope at the night observing sessions, and use a solar telescope to observe daytime sunspots if available. Presented by the UConn Physics Department. *Plus a nighttime observatory session.