To register for programs, please print and return our Winter 2014 Registration Form. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive a printed copy of our program, please email us here or call 860-486-4460.

January
Special Event: FOSA Annual Meeting, Saturday, January 25

February
Community Event: Annual Big Y Kids Fair, Saturday & Sunday, February 1 – 2
Workshop: Make a Bird Feeder Kids Drop-In Activity, Saturday, February 8
Teale Lecture: Climate Change in the American Mind, Thurs, February 13 CANCELLED
Community Event: CT Flower & Garden Show, Thursday – Sunday, February 20 – 23

March
Field Activity: Animal Tracking, Saturday, March 8
Museum Lecture: Medicinal Plants—Rich History But What Future? Saturday, March 15
Museum Lecture: Battlefields of the Pequot War Archaeology, Saturday, March 22
Teale Lecture: Oceans and the Global Demand for Food, Thursday, March 27
Museum Lecture: Brood II Cicadas, Saturday, March 29

April
Field Activity: Look Up! Spring’s Night Sky, Friday, April 4
Day Trip: New England Aquarium and Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Saturday, April 5
Teale Lecture: The Role of Science in Policy & Politics, Thursday, April 10
Field Activity: New Series: Exploring CT’s Towns–Manchester! Saturday, April 12
Field Activity: Wild Habitats and Intro to Letterboxing, Saturday, April 26

Special Lecture and Meeting of the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology
Change, Continuity, and Collaboration:
Studying Eastern Pequot History in Southeastern Connecticut

Dr. Stephen Silliman, Professor of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Boston
Saturday, January 25, 2 pm (Snow date: Sunday, January 26, 2 pm)
Smith Middle School Auditorium, 216 Addison Road, Glastonbury, Connecticut
$10 general admission; $5 for students with ID.
Current FOSA, ASC, Museum of Natural History members, and Glastonbury students and faculty are admitted free with ID.

When studying Native American history in New England, archaeologists must confront several critical questions. How do we measure culture change and continuity in the past? What are the implications of these concepts and interpretations on political and heritage issues today? What role does community-based archaeology with descendants play in addressing some of these issues? Join Dr. Stephen Silliman who will discuss a long-term collaborative archaeological project between the University of Massachusetts Boston and the Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation to provide some answers to these challenging questions.

Dr. Stephen Silliman is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where he has taught since 2001 after receiving his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include New England and North America, historical archaeology, indigenous and collaborative archaeologies, studies of colonialism, and heritage studies. Many of these research interests have manifested in his community-based archaeology program with the Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation of southeastern Connecticut, a university field school project that has been running since 2003. Dr. Silliman has published several books as well as articles in journals such as American Anthropologist, Historical Archaeology, Journal of Social Archaeology, and Journal of Anthropological Archaeology.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology (FOSA), the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center at UConn, and the Archaeology Society of Connecticut (ASC). The FOSA membership meeting begins before the lecture at 1 pm and is open to the public. In case of inclement weather, the snow date will be Sunday, January 26, 2014 at 2 pm. Notice of cancellation will be on WTIC AM by 10:30 am. 860.486.4460


The 10th Annual Big Y Kids Fair
Saturday, February 1 and Sunday, February 2
Connecticut Convention Center, Hartford

Stop by and visit the Museum and Archaeology Center’s booth at the Big Y Kids Fair and learn about natural and cultural history! The fair will have many hands-on activities for families with babies and toddlers, as well as older children. There will be celebrity appearances, roving magicians, animals, a kid’s fashion show, educational exhibits, and many vendors. Fun, entertainment, exhibits, prizes, and more are what you and your children will find at the 10th Annual Big Y Kids Fair in Hartford. For more information and directions visit: http://jenksproductions.com/kidsfair.html

Kids Drop-In Activity: Make a Bird Feeder!
David Colberg, Museum of Natural History, UConn
Saturday, February 8, 10 am to 12 noon
Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs
No registration required – FREE

Making a bird feeder is a fun way to learn about the birds around your home. With birdseed and common household items, such as water bottles, milk jugs, cardboard rolls, and a little imagination, you can create a fantastic birdfeeder for your backyard. Once hung, view birds up close and maybe hear them sing. Get out your binoculars and enjoy the show!

Drop in anytime between 10 am and 12 noon on this Saturday to join in this fun hands-on activity and explore your world through experimentation and observation. Students entering grades 1 through 5, accompanied by an adult.

Climate Change in the American Mind -CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER-
Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz, Director, Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Thursday, February 13, 4 pm - FREE
Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, Konover Auditorium
University of Connecticut, Storrs

Dr. Leiserowitz is a widely recognized expert on American and international public opinion on global warming, including public perception of climate change risks, support and opposition for climate policies, and willingness to make individual behavioral change. His research investigates the psychological, cultural, political, and geographic factors that drive public environmental perception and behavior. In this lecture, Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz will report on recent trends in Americans' climate change knowledge, attitudes, policy support, and behavior and discuss strategies for more effective public engagement.

Presented by UConn’s Edwin Way Teale Lecture Series – bringing leading scholars and scientists to the University of Connecticut to present public lectures on nature and the environment. 860.486.4460 - http://doddcenter.uconn.edu/asc/events/teale/teale.htm



33rd Annual Connecticut Flower and Garden Show
Thursday, February 20 to Sunday, February 23
Connecticut Convention Center, Hartford

Escape the winter elements and explore over 300 booths overflowing with fresh flowers, plants, herbs, bulbs, seeds, gardening books, and accessories. Immerse yourself in the variety of gardens, seminars, and landscape exhibits in full bloom. Visit the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History’s Ethnobotany exhibit within the Federated Garden Club's section of the show. “Backyard Paradise” is the theme for the 2014 show and the Federated Garden Club’s Special Exhibits section will feature a design and horticulture competition, demonstrations, and a multitude of educational exhibits. Join the Museum for this annual event offering an exciting preview of the spring and summer to come! For information and directions visit the Connecticut Flower and Garden Show at http://www.ctflowershow.com/ and Federated Garden Clubs at http://www.ctgardenclubs.org/flowershow.html

Animal Tracking
Paula Coughlin, Science Educator
Saturday, March 8, 10 am to 12 noon
Pomfret, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 5 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Many wild animals are active throughout winter. When the ground is soft or covered in snow, it’s not uncommon to find the tracks of various animals that have been out and about. These tracks can let us know what animals can be found in a particular habitat, as well as hint to some of their activities. From small birds and rodents, to larger animals like bobcats, deer, and bear, these unique tracks tell a story of native wildlife activity. Join naturalist and science educator, Paula Coughlin, to search for tracks and signs of winter animals and learn some basic tracking skills. Dress for the weather including appropriate footwear for moderate hiking in the snow or mud.



Medicinal Plants - Rich History, but is there a Future?
Gary Schulte, UConn Master Gardener
Saturday, March 15, 3 pm
Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Explore the evolution of plant materials utilized in medicinal formulations from ancient times to the present day. The story of medicinal plants has a complex history, connected to cultural practices, the use of natural resources, plant science, and the development of conventional “Western” medicine. What are the properties plants possess that make them medicinally useful and why do plants have these properties to begin with? Learn where medicinal plant research is today and where it might be headed.

Join Gary Schulte, UConn Master Gardener, who explored plant-based pharmaceuticals in partnership with the New York Botanical Garden and the Chinese Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine. He has also researched marine and terrestrial organisms, including identifying novel chemistry from red algae and chemical signaling compounds from marine invertebrates. His research experiences indicate that perhaps we are only scratching the surface of what nature can offer in medicinal products. Gary Schulte is a Member of Kahuna Scientific Consulting, LLC and was a Research Fellow with Pfizer Central Research in Groton.


Battlefields of the Pequot War Archaeology
Dr. Kevin McBride, Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center & UConn
Saturday, March 22, 3 pm
Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

After more than 375 years, the Pequot War (1636-1637) remains one of the most controversial and significant events in Colonial and Native history of America. In recognition of the national significance of the Pequot War, the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center has launched a long-term collaborative project to research, document, and preserve the battlefields of the Pequot War and in the process, inform and educate the public of its history, legacy, and significance in Connecticut and America’s history. The archaeologists conducting the Pequot War fieldwork utilize “battlefield archaeology,” in which remote sensing and metal detectors are used along with traditional archaeological methods when completing surveys.


What Role will the Oceans Play in Meeting the Global Demand for Food?
Dr. Steven D. Gaines, Dean, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management University of California - Santa Barbara
Thursday, March 27, 4 pm - FREE
Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, Konover Auditorium
University of Connecticut, Storrs

The research of Dr. Steven Gaines focuses on marine ecology and conservation, sustainable fisheries, the design of marine reserves, and the impact of climate change on ocean ecosystems. Professor Gaines currently acts as Dean of the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB. He has served as Director of the UC Santa Barbara Marine Science Institute, as UCSB Acting Dean of Science, and Acting Vice Chancellor for Research. Dr. Gaines currently serves as a science advisor for the Joint Ocean Commission.

Presented by UConn’s Edwin Way Teale Lecture Series – bringing leading scholars and scientists to the University of Connecticut to present public lectures on nature and the environment. 860.486.4460 - http://doddcenter.uconn.edu/asc/events/teale/teale.htm



Periodical Cicadas (Brood II)
Dr. John Cooley, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UConn
Saturday, March 29, 3 pm
Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Periodical cicadas are found only in eastern North America and are known for their unique combination of long, prime-numbered life cycles (13 or 17 years), precisely timed mass emergences, and loud active choruses. Brood II is among the largest 17-year periodical broods by geographic disbursement, stretching along the east coast from North Carolina to New York, including southern New England. Periodical cicadas are associated with a lot of lore, a bit of misinformation, and some exciting new discoveries. Join Dr. John Cooley from UConn’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and learn about the fascinating past seasons of periodical cicada research, updates on the Magicicada Mapping Project, the emergence of 17-year Brood II in Connecticut during the spring of 2013, and where to look for periodical cicadas in 2014.

Look Up! Viewing Spring’s Night Sky
Dr. Cynthia Peterson, Physics, UConn
Friday, April 4, 7 pm
UConn Storrs location (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Explore spring’s night sky during this visit to UConn’s historic planetarium. Learn how to identify the stars, planets, and other celestial objects observable throughout this season. During this program, Astronomy Professor Dr. Cynthia Peterson will offer a general orientation to the constellations, planets, and special celestial objects visible in the night sky using binoculars. She will also discuss the upcoming total lunar eclipse on April 15th, one of two visible here in 2014. While in the planetarium participants can also examine an orrery, a mechanical device illustrating the relative positions and motions of the planets.

Weather permitting, the session will conclude with a trip to the UConn Observatory on the roof of the physics building. Using binoculars and, if the conditions permit, the telescope, we will observe the crescent moon in Taurus in the western sky, Jupiter in Gemini, and Mars near opposition in Virgo. The upper half of the winter Milky Way will be present, plus Praesepe in Cancer, celestial objects in Leo, and the constellation Coma Berenices. Dress appropriately for the outdoor session (it will be cold after dark) and please bring binoculars!



New England Aquarium & Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Boston
Saturday, April 5
Advance registration required: Bus Fee $45 ($35 for Museum members)
Departing from UConn Storrs Campus (directions will be sent to participants)
All ages are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Explore Boston’s New England Aquarium, a global leader in ocean exploration and marine conservation. The Aquarium has completed a renovation of its main building and a top-to-bottom transformation of its iconic 200,000-gallon Giant Ocean Tank. Exhibits also include the Amazon Rainforest, Atlantic Harbor Seals, Blue Planet Center, Coral Reef Center, Marine Mammal Center, Penguins, the Shark and Ray Touch Tank, and IMAX Theater.

A short walk from the Aquarium you will find the historic Faneuil Hall Marketplace. Explore unique, locally loved, and nationally recognized retail shops. Check out the world-famous Quincy Market and experience different foods from across the globe at the restaurants, pubs, and booths. Enjoy the street performers and musicians as you stroll along the cobblestone walkways.

The bus will leave Storrs at 8 am. The bus will depart Boston for UConn at 5 pm. Please arrive and be prepared to board the bus prior to departure times. Admission to the Aquarium is not included and should be paid at the door or online. For a preview, and prices for admission packages, visit the New England Aquarium website http://www.neaq.org. To find out about Quincy Market shopping, dining, street theater, and other events, visit http://www.faneuilhallmarketplace.com.



Climate, Weather, Oceans, and Biodiversity: Science in Policy and Politics
Dr. Jane Lubchenco, Former Administrator of NOAA and
Valley Professor of Marine Biology, Oregon State University
Thursday, April 10, 4 pm - FREE
Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, Konover Auditorium
University of Connecticut, Storrs

Dr. Jane Lubchenco is the Valley Professor of Marine Biology at Oregon State University with research interests in community ecology, conservation biology, biodiversity, global change, and sustainability. She was the first woman to be appointed Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), serving in the position from 2009 to 2013. As NOAA Administrator, Dr. Lubchenco made restoring fisheries to sustainability and profitability, healthy oceans and coasts, ensuring continuity of the nation’s weather and other environmental satellites, developing a “Weather-Ready Nation,” promoting climate science, and strengthening science at NOAA top priorities.

Presented by UConn’s Edwin Way Teale Lecture Series – bringing leading scholars and scientists to the University of Connecticut to present public lectures on nature and the environment. 860.486.4460 - http://doddcenter.uconn.edu/asc/events/teale/teale.htm

New Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns – Manchester!
Susan Barlow, Manchester Historical Society
Saturday, April 12, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm
Manchester, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The natural and cultural history of Connecticut, in each of its 169 towns, has a unique story to tell. From the indigenous peoples arriving after the glaciers receded 10,000 years ago and the European explorers and settlers establishing colonies in the “New World,” to the innovators of the industrial revolution leading to the present day, Connecticut is steeped in history. Join us as we explore Connecticut’s towns and learn about the people and places that have shaped and continue to shape the Constitution State.

The first town to be explored in the series is Manchester, “A City of Village Charm.” From its farming community beginnings as part of Hartford and then East Hartford, Manchester was incorporated in 1823 and became an important industrial center that included the E.E. Hilliard Company Woolen Mills, Union Cotton Mills, and the Cheney Brothers silk manufacturing company. The Case Brothers left their mark on Manchester, operating successful paper mills and establishing the Tonica Springs water-bottling plant, with international distribution of “Highland Rock Water.” The Case Family was also known for sharing their wilderness land with the public for numerous outdoor activities, with the hiking trails of Case Mountain still popular to this day.

Join Susan Barlow from the Manchester Historical Society, along with a few special guest speakers, and explore the grounds of A. Wells Case’s mansion. A. Wells Case was the Case brother who established the carriage paths, stairs, and bridges in the Case Mountain area. Learn how the Case family rebuilt after fires and floods. Then climb to the summit of Case Mountain for remarkable views of Manchester and Hartford, and learn about the Eastern Border Fault that cuts through the state.

This hike may be challenging for some, and will include a 2.5-mile walk, a steep hill, and some rocky and bumpy terrain.



Wild Habitats and Intro to Letterboxing
Heather Alexson, Office of State Archaeology Staff Assistant
Saturday, April 26, 10 am to 12 noon
Willington, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $10 ($5 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 6 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Come kick off the hiking season by exploring the forests and wetlands of the Fenton-Ruby Park and Wildlife Preserve. We will learn about letterboxing as we explore these wild habitats and their inhabitants. Letterboxing is a fun outdoor quest combining puzzle-solving and navigation, either through landmarks and landscape features or orienteering using a compass. You will learn all you need to know to get started letterboxing to continue on your own adventures. Letterboxing can suit all ages and experience levels. All that is needed is weather-appropriate clothing and long pants, comfortable hiking shoes, and an eye for "treasure" hunting.